Date of publishing:

15.12.2022

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21104/CL.2022.4.03

Abstract:

Tohono O’odham (formerly Papago), a Native American language spoken in southern Arizona and northern Mexico, has been frequently reported as endangered. The contribution aims to present efforts to revitalize and stabilize the language (as well as its culture), particularly the activities conducted by Ofelia Zepeda, an enrolled member of the Tohono O’odham Indian Nation. Zepeda, working as Professor of Linguistics at the University of Arizona in Tucson, has been contributing to the revival of her mother tongue primarily as a linguist and language educator and activist. She has been also known for her creative writing incorporating Tohono O’odham into her poems.

Keywords

Tohono O’odham; endangered languages; revitalization; Ofelia Zepeda; eco-poetry

Article Text

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